Using todo

TonyA2Kwiziq community member

Using todo

Yesterday in a store I said to the owner "tiene todo." I was trying to say "you have everything."

He replied (I think) "tengo de todo." I wasn't sure if he was correcting me or not.

Did I get my question right? What was he saying?

Thanks so much, Tony

Asked 1 year ago
JohnB2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Without knowing the context, I would take it at face value because I have found that the Spanish are direct and say just what they want to say - no frills. You say that you were asking a questions so ...

You have everything? "¿Usted tiene todo?" - when the formal conjugation is used they include the pronoun 'usted."

"Tengo de todo" - [Yes] I have everything. I'm not sure why the "de" would be in there but someone else might comment on that.

Hope that helps.

TonyA2Kwiziq community member

Hey John, thanks for the response. Sorry, I wasn't asking a question (my mistake in the post) - I was complementing him on the huge range of stuff he had when I said "tiene todo!"

So I'm wondering if "tengo DE todo" is what he said. Is it a correct expression?

Gracias!

InmaKwiziq team member

Hi Tony

There is a difference in context between:

Tiene todo.

and

Tiene de todo.

Imagine you go to that shop with a list of 10 items to buy and you find all you need in the shop; you could say as a comment to the shop assistant: ¡Tiene todo!

This todo here is referring to "everything you had on your list", i.e. a "specific everything". 

Now, imagine you go to a shop (with no list) and after walking around the shop you realise that it is a shop where one can find absolutely everything, a huge variety of different things..., you may say:

¡Tiene de todo! ¡Esta tienda tiene de todo! ¡Usted tiene de todo!

This todo means a "general everything", so whenever you need something you know you can go to that shop you most probably find whatever you are looking for.

I don't think there is any distinction in English for these two sentences. I think in both cases the comment would be the same: You've got everything! or It's got everything!; both meaning either everything I need/I have on my list or just a general everything.

I hope this is clear and clarifies the difference. 

The person was right to correct your sentence, as he/she knew that you were referring to the second case, a "general everything".

Saludos

Inma

Using todo

Yesterday in a store I said to the owner "tiene todo." I was trying to say "you have everything."

He replied (I think) "tengo de todo." I wasn't sure if he was correcting me or not.

Did I get my question right? What was he saying?

Thanks so much, Tony

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