Conjugate salir in El Presente (present tense)

Salir (to exit / to go out) is semi-regular in El Presente:

yo salgo
sales
él / ella / Ud. sale
nosotros / nosotras
salimos 
vosotros / vosotras
salís
ellos / ellas / Uds.   salen

Most of the endings are regular but note that the 'yo' form has a g. As with regular -ir verbs there is an accent on the í in the vosotros form. 

See and listen to these examples:

Yo salgo con mis amigos todos los fines de semana.
I go out with my friends every weekend.

sales de trabajar muy tarde.
You get out of work very late.

El gato sale a la calle por la ventana.
The cat goes outside through the window.

Nosotros salimos a pasear por el parque.
We go for a walk in the park.

¿Vosotras salís hoy?
Are you going out today?

Los toreros salen por la puerta grande.
The bullfighters go out through the big door.

See also: Conjugate regular -ir verbs like vivir in El Presente (present tense)

For more verbs that follow a similar pattern, see: 
Verbos yo -go (presente)

 

Learn more about these related Spanish grammar topics

Examples and resources

¿Vosotras salís hoy?
Are you going out today?


Nosotros salimos a pasear por el parque.
We go for a walk in the park.


El gato sale a la calle por la ventana.
The cat goes outside through the window.


Yo salgo con mis amigos todos los fines de semana.
I go out with my friends every weekend.


Los toreros salen por la puerta grande.
The bullfighters go out through the big door.


sales de trabajar muy tarde.
You get out of work very late.


Q&A

Ricky

Kwiziq community member

11 March 2019

3 replies

salir vs irse

When are irse and salir used? What's the difference?

Thanks

Ricky

Inma

Kwiziq language super star

11 March 2019

11/03/19

Hola Ricky,

They have slightly different meanings. "Irse" normally means "to leave [a place]", for example: 

"Me estaba aburriendo en la fiesta, así que me fui."  (I was getting bored at the party so I left.)

"Bueno, chicos, me voy."  (OK, guys, I'm off.)

And "salir" means "to get out/ to go out", for example:

"Ayer salí con mis amigos." (Yesterday I went out with my friends.)

Sal ahora mismo! (Get out right now!)

Hope this helps

Inma

Ricky

Kwiziq community member

12 March 2019

12/03/19

Thanks, Inma, but I'm having a hard time telling the difference between 'to get out" and "to leave." Can you help with this?

Inma

Kwiziq language super star

12 March 2019

12/03/19

When we use "irse" we generally mean that we are "going for good", it implies no return at least soon. For example: "Estaba harta de la ciudad, así que me fui." (I was fed up with the city so I left.) Using me fui here will imply that you go with no return. However you could say: "Salí de la ciudad unos días para pasar unos días tranquilos en el campo." (I got out of the city for a few days to spend some quiet days in the countryside.) Using salí here implies that it is less definite.

Sometimes they are interchangeable though. For example you could equally say:

"Vete de la clase" (Leave the class) or "Sal de la clase" (Leave the class)

Saludos

Inma

Nicole

Kwiziq community member

11 March 2019

2 replies

Sentence: El gato sale a la calle por la ventana.

I was reading this sentence:

The cat walks out the window.

El gato sale a la calle por la ventana.

It seemed to me that this means more like: The cat go out through

the window.  So I put it into Google, which gave: 

Google: The cat goes outside through the window. Then tried another site:

Reverso: The cat walks out the window.and they translated it as: The cat walks out the window.

I would appreciate getting a clarification on this.  Thank you.

Shui

Kwiziq language super star

11 March 2019

11/03/19

Hola Nicole

I've revised the English translation of this which wasn't correct. "Salir a la calle" is a set expression in Spanish which means "to go outside".

I've changed the English to: The cat goes outside through the window.

Saludos

Shui

Nicole

Kwiziq community member

12 March 2019

12/03/19

Thank you for your quick reply. 

Else

Kwiziq community member

8 October 2018

1 reply

Tú sales de trabajar muy tarde. You get out of work late - why is iy 'Muy' tarde?

Inma

Kwiziq language super star

8 October 2018

8/10/18

Muy means "very", but it is missing from the English translation, it should say "You get out of work very late". We'll change it. 

Gracias

Inma

Clever stuff underway!