Wrong answers vs right answers

RA2Kwiziq community member

Wrong answers vs right answers

When "explain this" for less than correct answers refers to why the correct answer applies, I think it would be just as helpful if the program explained why the chosen wrong answer is not correct and under what circumstance it would apply.  Too hard maybe for "fill the blank" but possible for  multiple choice.  I think I saw a table that compares these impersonal pronouns, how can I find it? (Algún, alguno, algunos, algunas)

Also, when I looked up the wrong answer I found what I think is less correct English.

Guillermo didn't know many pubs and he wanted to go to some (a random pub). = "Guillermo no conocía muchos bares y quería ir a algún. ALGUNO."

In this case, SOME, implies more than one.

Asked 9 months ago
InmaKwiziq team member

Hola R,

As you say, for a "fill in the blank" exercise this would be impossible as everybody could write anything. As per multiple choice answers, I will pass on your thoughts. Maybe in the future we could add this function. 

When you are referring to the translation in English using a plural (some) and then using a singular "alguno" (instead of algunos), it is not that the English is wrong; the problem is that there is no equivalent in English to express this. This is why we add the "a random..." in brackets to make students aware that, despite using the plural "some", what we mean in Spanish is "a random something" or "the odd one". 

The table that you mentioned, could it be this one here when talking about the Indefinite Pronouns?

Inma

Wrong answers vs right answers

When "explain this" for less than correct answers refers to why the correct answer applies, I think it would be just as helpful if the program explained why the chosen wrong answer is not correct and under what circumstance it would apply.  Too hard maybe for "fill the blank" but possible for  multiple choice.  I think I saw a table that compares these impersonal pronouns, how can I find it? (Algún, alguno, algunos, algunas)

Also, when I looked up the wrong answer I found what I think is less correct English.

Guillermo didn't know many pubs and he wanted to go to some (a random pub). = "Guillermo no conocía muchos bares y quería ir a algún. ALGUNO."

In this case, SOME, implies more than one.

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