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El español en Filipinas

Spanish online reading and listening practice - level C1

Spain colonised the Philippines for just over three centuries; during that time Spanish was the official language. This reading and listening exercise can help you practise the passive voice, El Pretérito Pluscuamperfecto de Subjuntivo and using cuyo, cuya, cuyos, cuyas.

Exercise: El español en Filipinas

Listen to the audio, then read the transcript. Click any phrase for the translation and links to related grammar lessons which you can add to your Kwiziq notebook to practise later.

Text by Silvia Píriz and audio by Inma Sánchez

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Q&A Forum 2 questions, 2 answers

GaryA2Kwiziq community member

Spanish influence on Tagalog

I love this article!  I spent over two years in the ROP and I loved the people!  I think an article on how Spanish affected the major indigenous language Tagalog would be fascinating.  For example the Tagalog greeting "Komo staka" is very close to Como esta and the term for very good "may sarap" is from muey sabroso.  (My spelling of Tagalog words are probably wrong.)  I also remember that the word for stop in Tagalog is "parar".  I know that during my time of the ROP I never heard anyone speak in Spanish.  I only wish that I had known some Spanish back then (circa 1977-1980).  It certainly would have helped me to learn more Tagalog phrases.  

Asked 1 week ago
ClaraC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Great post Gary! 

Gracias por compartir :)

Spanish influence on Tagalog

I love this article!  I spent over two years in the ROP and I loved the people!  I think an article on how Spanish affected the major indigenous language Tagalog would be fascinating.  For example the Tagalog greeting "Komo staka" is very close to Como esta and the term for very good "may sarap" is from muey sabroso.  (My spelling of Tagalog words are probably wrong.)  I also remember that the word for stop in Tagalog is "parar".  I know that during my time of the ROP I never heard anyone speak in Spanish.  I only wish that I had known some Spanish back then (circa 1977-1980).  It certainly would have helped me to learn more Tagalog phrases.  

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LarryB2Kwiziq community member

Bad translation

The translation of "arrastrado" here as "dragged down" is not correct. In this context, it means "influenced."


Asked 2 weeks ago
ShuiKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hola Larry

Thank you for your feedback! This has been changed now.

Saludos

Shui

Bad translation

The translation of "arrastrado" here as "dragged down" is not correct. In this context, it means "influenced."


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