Using terminar de+ [infinitive] = to finish doing something

To express in Spanish "to finish doing something" as opposed to "to start doing something" we use this structure:

Terminar + de + infinitive

Here are some examples:

Hoy termino de trabajar un poco antes.
Today I'll finish working a bit earlier. [lit: I finish working]

Andrea ha terminado de comer a las 4 y media.
Andrea finished eating at half past four. (lit: has finished eating]

Terminaremos de recoger todo bastante tarde.
We will finish tidying up everyhing quite late.

Tengo que terminar de escribir este párrafo.
I have to finish writing this paragraph.

The verb "acabar" is occasionally used as a synonym for "terminar" in this context, but the latter is a lot more common.

 

"He acabado de limpiar el piso a las 10 de la noche." (less common)

"He terminado de limpiar el pido a las 10 de la noche." (more common)

(I finished cleaning the flat at 10 PM.)

Be careful not to confuse this with acabar to express "to have just done something". See this lesson to revise this:

Acabar de + [infinitive] = to have just done / just did something

Also, don't confuse this other structure using acabar/terminar to express "to end up doing something".

See Using acabar/terminar + [infinitive/gerund] = to end up doing something

See also Empezar/comenzar + a + [infinitivo] = to begin/start doing something

Learn more about these related Spanish grammar topics

Examples and resources

Tengo que terminar de escribir este párrafo.
I have to finish writing this paragraph.


Terminaremos de recoger todo bastante tarde.
We will finish tidying up everyhing quite late.


Andrea ha terminado de comer a las 4 y media.
Andrea finished eating at half past four. (lit: has finished eating]


Hoy termino de trabajar un poco antes.
Today I'll finish working a bit earlier. [lit: I finish working]


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