Using nada to say nothing or anything

We use the indefinite pronoun nada to say nothing or anything.

Read and listen to these examples:

No vimos nada desde nuestro asiento.
We couldn't see anything from our seats.

Miguel no ha comido nada desde esta mañana.
Miguel hasn't eaten anything since this morning.

In the examples above, we use nada preceded by the negation no + verb. In this case, we can translate nada as anything in English. 

Nada es para siempre.
Nothing is forever.

Nada va a cambiar entre nosotros.
Nothing is going to change between us.

In the examples from above, observe how when nada is placed at the front of the sentence it translates as nothing in English.

Nada can also be used in negative questions  and it means anything.

For example:

¿No tienes nada que decirnos ahora?
Don't you have anything to tell us now?

¿No han comido nada en todo el día?
Haven't they eaten anything all day?

But if the question is affirmative we use algo instead. For example:

¿Tienes algo para mí?
Do you have anything for me?

See also Pronombre indefinido and Using algo to say something or anything.

Learn more about these related Spanish grammar topics

Examples and resources

No vimos nada desde nuestro asiento.
We couldn't see anything from our seats.


Nada va a cambiar entre nosotros.
Nothing is going to change between us.


¿No han comido nada en todo el día?
Haven't they eaten anything all day?


¿No tienes nada que decirnos ahora?
Don't you have anything to tell us now?


Miguel no ha comido nada desde esta mañana.
Miguel hasn't eaten anything since this morning.


Nada es para siempre.
Nothing is forever.


Q&A

John

Kwiziq community member

23 February 2019

2 replies

Nuestro asiento - unfinished previous question

Hola,

The example given is "No vimos nada desde nuestro asiento" and is translated as "We couldn't see anything from our seats." Should the phrase read "desde nuestros / nuestras asientos?

Inma

Kwiziq language super star

24 February 2019

24/02/19

Hola John

Sometimes in Spanish in this sort of sentences where it is referring to a plural noun (our seats) we can also use the singular form of it. By using the singular we still understand and it is completely clear that we are referring to "each of our seats".

Other similar sentences would be for example:

"Los niños se fueron a su casa/ a sus casas." (The kids went home/to their houses.)

"Los estudiantes sacaron su lápiz/ sus lápices." (The students took out their pencils.)

Hope this helps,

Un saludo

Inma

John

Kwiziq community member

25 February 2019

25/02/19

Hola Inma,

Yes that make sense. The plural form is "understood" even though it isn't used. I think we would do similar things in English - for example "The children ate their meal." Thanks. John

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