Relative pronoun

JamesA2Kwiziq community member

Relative pronoun

I am interested in the reasoning for using "los cuales" in "no se sabe si permitirán a los niños a llevar sus móviles apagados dentro de sus mochilas, los cuales podrán encender al final del día".  My understanding is that "que" is used by default when referring to a specific noun, in this case "sus móviles", while "el/la/los/las cuales" is an optional, more formal alternative.  But in my answer the simple "que" was deemed incorrect.  Is this because the "que" would refer to "sus mochilas", being the noun immediately preceding, so the "los cuales" is required to disambiguate?  Or have I misunderstood something more basic?    

Asked 1 year ago
ClaraC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Hi James, 

As far as I'm aware, the use of 'los cuales' is more formal. I tend to agree with you though James, in the context of this passage, the use of 'los cuales' tells us that it is referring to 'the mobiles' (masculine) rather than the 'backpack' (mochila-feminine).

I'm sure that Inma or a member of the team will address your query.

Clara :)

Que/ el cual/ la cual/ los cuales/ quien/ quienes = who, that, which (Spanish relative pronouns)

InmaKwiziq team member

Hola James y Clara

You are right. We simply forgot to add the option using "que" for this line. It will be added soon. Los cuales is indeed more formal than the more common "que".

Saludos

Inma

James asked:View original

Relative pronoun

I am interested in the reasoning for using "los cuales" in "no se sabe si permitirán a los niños a llevar sus móviles apagados dentro de sus mochilas, los cuales podrán encender al final del día".  My understanding is that "que" is used by default when referring to a specific noun, in this case "sus móviles", while "el/la/los/las cuales" is an optional, more formal alternative.  But in my answer the simple "que" was deemed incorrect.  Is this because the "que" would refer to "sus mochilas", being the noun immediately preceding, so the "los cuales" is required to disambiguate?  Or have I misunderstood something more basic?    

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