Just want to check this:

MarcosC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Just want to check this:

One of the examples is:

Su actitud se volvió violenta de repente.

Is it correct to assume that the change is a lasting one, as with someone who got hit on the head with a shovel and after that was a violent person?

Compared to:

Su actitud se puso violenta de repente.

In this case, cowboys in a saloon in a Western movie insult someone and he stands up quickly and draws his gun?

Just want to double check that these differences are correct.  Thanks.

Asked 1 month ago
InmaKwiziq team member

Hola Marcos

Yes (sort of) - ponerse and volverse, as you've seen in the lesson, are sometimes interchangeable, the former implying more of a sudden/temporary state and the latter implying more permanence. But you should take this general theory with a pinch of salt, really, because it also depends on the actual context and words used each time. In this case, with "actitud" the use of "ponerse violenta" wouldn't be a chosen option for natives, and I don't think there is specific reason, it's just not normally used when you refer to "attitude". You would normally stick with "volverse" - then the "de repente" will give it the sudden/temporary nuance. 

Sorry I can't be more definite, it is just there is no clear cut rule with these "changing" verbs. The cases explained in the lesson are the most general ones.

I like your example about "someone being hit on the head with a shovel" : ))

Just want to check this:

One of the examples is:

Su actitud se volvió violenta de repente.

Is it correct to assume that the change is a lasting one, as with someone who got hit on the head with a shovel and after that was a violent person?

Compared to:

Su actitud se puso violenta de repente.

In this case, cowboys in a saloon in a Western movie insult someone and he stands up quickly and draws his gun?

Just want to double check that these differences are correct.  Thanks.

Sign in to submit your answer

Don't have an account yet? Join today

Ask a question

Find your Spanish level for FREE

Test your Spanish to the CEFR standard

Find your Spanish level
I'll be right with you...